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  • July 2009

    Study Demonstrates Significant Benefits of F-FDG PET in Evaluating Colorectal Liver Metastases

    Journal of Nuclear Medicine | Theo J.M. Ruers, Bastiaan Wiering, Joost R.M. van der Sijp, Rudi M. Roumen, Koert P. de Jong, Emile F.I. Comans, Jan Pruim, Helena M. Dekker, Paul F.M. Krabbe, and Wim J.G. Oyen

    Article:

    Improved Selection of Patients for Hepatic Surgery of Colorectal Liver Metastases with 18F-FDG PET: A Randomized Study

    Author:

    Theo J.M. Ruers, Bastiaan Wiering, Joost R.M. van der Sijp, Rudi M. Roumen, Koert P. de Jong, Emile F.I. Comans, Jan Pruim, Helena M. Dekker, Paul F.M. Krabbe, and Wim J.G. Oyen

    Publication:

    Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Vol. 50, No. 7, July 2009

    Summary

    In a randomized multi-center study of 150 patients with colorectal liver metastases recommended for surgery, Ruers et al evaluated the benefits of F-FDG PET by comparing the utilization of F-FDG PET combined with CT to the utilization of CT alone for staging and developing surgical recommendations, with the primary metric for determining success being the overall percentage of futile laparotomies (abdominal incisions to resect the tumor growth) resulting from each diagnostic strategy.

    F-FDG PET proved highly successful when combined with CT, ultimately reducing the percentage of futile laparotomies – defined as either any laparotomy that did not result in complete tumor treatment, revealed benign disease, or did not result in a disease-free survival period longer than 6 months – by a net 17 percent (45 percent for CT alone versus 28 percent for F-FDG PET/CT), or a relative reduction of 38 percent.

    The authors also noted that because this data was collected between 2002 and 2006, they were forced to use separate PET and CT equipment in making their determinations. With the recent innovative breakthrough and ability to utilize joint PET/CT technology, Ruers et al wrote that in the future β€œthe actual reduction of futile laparotomies will be larger than 38%.”

    Click here to access the full article.

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