You are here: Value of Medical Imaging

  • September 2009

    New Survey: 71 Percent of Voters Oppose Medicare Cuts for Medical Imaging

    Zogby Interactive

    78 Percent of Poll Respondents Believe Further Imaging Cuts Will Impact the Quality of Early Detection for Serious Diseases, such as Cancer and Heart Disease

    66 Percent of Voters Urge Obama to Tell Congress to Reject Proposed Cuts to Medical Imaging, Poll Finds

    Summary:

    A public opinion survey released on the eve of President Obama’s Joint Address to Congress on health care shows that Americans recognize the value of medical imaging as a critical component of high-quality health care. Specifically, 71 percent of voters oppose making further Medicare cuts to advanced imaging tests and screenings, such as MRIs and CT scans, as a means to pay for health care reform, the Access to Medical Imaging Coalition (AMIC), a coalition of physician, patient and imaging manufacturer groups, said today.

    In an online survey of 4,426 likely voters conducted September 4–8 by Zogby Interactive, 78 percent of respondents said that Congress’s proposed cuts to medical imaging services, including MRIs, CTs and PET scans, will have a significant impact on physicians’ ability to detect diseases – such as heart disease and cancer – at their earliest stages. Moreover, 66 percent said that President Obama should urge Congress to reject these additional medical imaging cuts when he addresses lawmakers tomorrow.

    Zogby International was commissioned by Powell Tate to conduct an online survey of 4,426 voters. A sampling of Zogby International’s online panel, which is representative of the adult population of the US, was invited to participate. Slight weights were added to region, party, age, race, gender, education to more accurately reflect the population. The margin of error is +/- 1.6 percentage points. Margins of error are higher in sub-groups.

    Click here to access and read the full report.

Connect with Us Online

  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • YouTube
  • Flickr