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PATIENTS & FAMILIES

  • Roger Howe, Minnesota

    When Roger Howe finished his external beam radiation treatment for prostate cancer, he thought he would never have to worry about cancer again. A year and a half later, an MRI Roger received for a different ailment revealed that cancer had again intruded on his life – this time in a bigger way.

    Roger and his wife, Connie, both Right Scan Right Time Ambassadors

    After a second MRI, Roger’s doctor confirmed he had Cholangiocarcinoma, a very rare form of liver cancer that had already surrounded a big part of his liver. Neither surgery nor liver transplant was an option. Thanks to advice Roger heeded from fellow Right Scan Right Time Ambassador Suzanne Lindley, founder of YES! Beat Liver Tumors, Roger underwent SIR-Spheres treatment, gave him two invaluable, quality years to his life.

    Roger and his wife Connie were able to attend the Access to Medical Imaging Coalition’s Advocacy Day on the Hill in Washington, D.C. at which they shared Roger’s story with Members of Congress, reminding them how important affordable, timely access to imaging is.

    A story in the St. Paul Pioneer Press about his trip said it all: “Roger traveled with his wife — despite having incurable bile-duct cancer and perhaps only a few months to live. Howe left behind his golf, time with his granddaughter and planning for his own funeral because a timely CT scan discovered his cancer and bought him more time. He fears Medicare cuts may make imaging services harder for others to find. ‘Without CT scans and MRIs, I certainly would be dead by now.’”

    Unfortunately Roger and Connie just recently found out that his cancer was progressing and he didn’t have much longer to live. He passed away peacefully this week after a courageous battle. We will always remember Roger for his take on cancer – always that of a true survivor: “I have a magnificent wife and family. I love my life even with Cholangiocarcinoma. I am a very lucky man.”

    Read more about Roger’s story on his CaringBridge page.

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